The Blue Light of Death: With the World At Our Fingertips Why Would We Look Away?

Sometimes it’s a fantastic idea to take a break. I’m taking a break right now from writing about more serious addiction issues like alcoholism and illicit drug use to touch on one of the most widespread addictions (if you consider it one) facing not just the west, but third world countries as well. Those blue lit screens we are glued to, we just can’t take the time away from them that we should because in the past few years the whole world has become available, and presented, to us on screens in varying sizes. Nearly all the world’s information is at our fingertips, the same goes for entertainment and communication, it’s truly impressive isn’t it? It is. There’s no doubt about that, but to quote an old, and imaginary friend of mine, “with great power comes great responsibility”. Well, now that the day’s cheesy quote quota has been reached, let’s talk about phones, tablets and computers. I honestly don’t remember much about life before all this accessibility. The convenience of carrying around a powerful device like a smartphone in my pocket can’t be easily dismissed, but on the other hand neither can the feeling of being disconnected after only a few minutes away from social media and apps like Skype. Can’t ignore my sleep issues, eye strain or the temptation to get into meaningless and pointless internet debates with strangers from Uzbekistan either. Not the biggest problems, I suppose, when we compare them to those faced by alcoholics and drug addicts, but they are problems right?

 

It’s gotten to the point that texting while driving accidents are not only more frequent but are, in fact, more deadly than drunk driving accidents. Large numbers of people are on their smartphones or tablets while having sex (http://www.rawstory.com/2013/07/one-in-five-young-adults-admit-to-using-smartphone-during-sex/), not to mention texting while in the shower and while using the bathroom.

 

It seems we can’t disconnect. We are, by nature, social creatures for the most part, and with a smartphone even the most introverted and loneliest of us can feel a strong sense of connection with thousands of other people, which isn’t always a bad thing.